Death of the Guitar Hero

Death of the Guitar Hero

After attending Desert Trip a couple weeks ago, one thing became abundantly clear: the guitar hero that flew high through the 60’s and into the 90’s is now dead. While guitarists like Keith Richards and Pete Townshend will continue to play sold out stadium shows and are somehow still alive, the world has moved on. Guitar driven bands like the Rolling Stones and The Who are purely nostalgia at this point. No one will top their success, no one will top their influence on culture, and no one will be able to replicate that sound without being labeled a cover band.

While listening the star studded classic rock artists at Desert Trip, I started to get tired of the flashy guitar solos. A large portion of Roger Waters’s and Paul McCartney’s sets consisted of their studio guitarists dominating songs with their shredding solos. Who cares? So you can shred? If you’re not Pete Townshend, or Neil Young you’re a waste of the our time. Do you know how many people in this world can play guitar like you can? You aren’t special.

The songs are special. The effect they had on culture was special. Don’t waste my time with generic guitar solos. I want to hear songs that push the boundaries of what is acceptable, and words that rip my soul apart. It’s time baby boomers move on to a new soundtrack and embrace the future

GOING to CALIFORNIA

Alec and I grew up in Portland playing music together in our best friend’s house nestled in the rain forest. When Alec turned eighteen, he made the trek down to Los Angeles for college and continued to chase music. I left for LA October 3rd, 2016 at the tender age of twenty five to join him in LA and officially combine musical forces.

I decided to move down to LA for the same stereotypical reason every musician does: to follow my dreams and find a sugar mamma to help support me financially. It’s not like musicians make any money nowadays. We are going to change that though.

Prior to my departure, I gave away and sold off most of my possessions. I told myself whatever could fit in my Suburu Outback, I would take to California. I knew I would be living on an air mattress in Alec’s living room so I didn’t want to cramp anyones style.

Having lived in the lush Pacific Northwest my whole life, moving to California made me nervous. Would I get dehydrated? Could I drink the tap water? Would I get sunburnt? After living here for a week, it's clear the convenience of the 21st century has prevailed, at least for now. All the practicality surrounding survival, are all in place. As long as I have a little bit of money, I should be able to survive. And more importantly becoming a successful songwriter and performer.

In due time, Freaks of the Sea will become a global inspiration train that will help people feel less alone in the shoes they navigate this world in. This is the Freaks of the Sea blog. This is just one of the pieces to the puzzle.